The Cleave Poetry Webzine [ISSN: 1758-9223]

Frenzy by Diana Manister

In submission on February 5, 2009 at 10:57 pm

frenzy6x8graphic

This visual poem occurs at a point in my long text poem concerning a combat veteran whose memories of what was done in war are being unsuccessfully repressed. Alfred Hitchcock’s murder mystery Frenzy about a London murderer triggers memories the poem’s narrator would rather not recall. The movie and actual combat recollections mix in the confused mental state the subject is experiencing.

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  1. This visual poem occurs at a point in my long text poem concerning a combat veteran whose memories of what was done in war are being unsuccessfully repressed. Alfred Hitchcock’s murder mystery Frenzy about a London murderer triggers memories the poem’s narrator would rather not recall. The movie and actual combat recollections mix in the confused mental state the subject is experiencing.

  2. Interesting work on an important topic — need to see more.

  3. Just from this visual excerpt, the the movie murderer and the veteran seem to overlay into parallels as the reader questions which applies where, including ultimately the word “frenzy” to apply to the combat veteran as well, with questions of unconscious complicity and such.

    C

  4. I guess each poet interprets a form in his or her own way. For me, a cleave poem, like the meaning of the word “cleave” itself, both separates and comes together. That is, the parts sometimes stand alone as self-contained fragments, but at other times take their places in a larger context.

    In this case, the long poem in which this smaller poem occurs provides the narrative that binds the fragments together.

    Dan hit my intention squarely on the head when he relates the state of mind of the murderer (both Hitchcock’s and Jack the Ripper’s — the poem’s illustration accompanied an article in a London newspaper announcing the discovery of another of The Ripper’s victims) to that of the combat veteran.

    Bachelard wrote in his great book “The Right to Dream” that nothing is so bitter as a memory one is trying to forget. The gory scenes in “Frenzy” revived combat memories which haunt my narrator, who is on the verge of a nervous breakdown after being discharged as unfit to fight.

    The cleave format is perfect for inducing in the reader the same feeling of confusion and disunity as the subject of the poem is experiencing, his failed attempt to make some sense of his perceptions.

    Thanks for your fine comments; it’s very gratifying to know the poem is accomplishing its purpose!

    Diana

    .

    Diana

  5. Sorry, I meant that Clattery described the coincidence of the mental states of the veteran and the murderer. I should add that Jack the Ripper and the Frenzy murderer did not suffer the disabling guilt that the poem’s subject does.

    Watch this spot for further adventures of my main character as he struggles with the wish to be finished with the struggle.

    We should not assume by the way, that the veteran is male.

    Diana
    .

  6. What a perfect format to portray the character’s unfocused, bombarded state of fragmented consciouslness while dramatically and successfully creating the feelings of overwhelm within this audience member! How effective and such an strong use of this style of writing. Thank you.

  7. Many thanks Kathryn! Sorry I just saw your comment now! I’m so glad you got the poem’s dissociation as an expressive element!

    Very best to you!

    Diana

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